Archive for the ‘Non-Investment Stuff’ Category

New Home, New Problems

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013
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So, money.fywservices.com now has its own home at cheaplazyinvestor.com. There is still a problem with the watch list (a new problem, I never finished the watch list), and if I want to do silly things like posting I have to use a different browser than where I read it because the cheap host throws a 403 error if I’m logged in (only screws up for admin, you should be fine).

Wish me luck.

Not Cheap, Definitly Lazy, Not (Quite) Investing

Thursday, February 7th, 2013
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Early adoption is never cheap, which is why I always buy one generation back on electronics (2 generations for the more mature ones). But  love the Cheapskate site and I like the idea of this product, even if I won’t buy it for another revision or 6.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13845_3-57567429-58/get-a-nest-learning-thermostat-for-$198/

Bargain Hunter Bookmarks

Friday, January 25th, 2013
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While the title of the blog is Cheap, Lazy Investing, the URL does start with money, and a friend of mine says that investing in one’s own happiness has the highest return. To that end, I check a series of sites everyday for bargains (and one just to get a daily drawing entry). They are listed below. The order is the order in which they were added to my daily check reminder and not any other order:

http://www.woot.com/

http://www.meijer.com/s/big-steals/_/N-5io?cmpid=wootgeneric

http://www.dailysteals.com/

http://www.icemonkey.com/

http://1saleaday.com/

http://search.pch.com/

http://thatdailydeal.com/

http://dodby.com/

My Dream

Thursday, November 18th, 2010
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Dilbert.com

Somedays, You Just Have to Laugh it Off

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010
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http://humor.fywservices.com/2010/09/a-happy-retirement/

Taking the Joke Seriously

Thursday, March 11th, 2010
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I recently received an email I believe was intended for my joke blog, but I took it up seriously. Below is the thread with names removed:

I’m not good at calculating these high numbers….but sure makes ya scratch your head!

Oilfield Math;

Working in the oilfield with others such as myself and a wealth of combined experience we understand the accuracy of the following.

Think of it this way:

A clunker that travels 12,000 miles a year at 15 mpg uses 800 gallons of gas a year.

A vehicle that travels 12,000 miles a year at 25 mpg uses 480 gallons a year.

So, the average Cash for Clunkers transaction will reduce US gasoline

consumption by 320 gallons per year.

They claim 700,000 vehicles so that’s 224 million gallons saved per year.

That equates to a bit over 5 million barrels of oil.

5 million barrels is about 5 hours worth of US consumption.

More importantly, 5 million barrels of oil at $70 per barrel costs about $350 million dollars

So, the government paid $3 billion of our tax dollars to save $350 million.

We spent $8.57 for every dollar we saved.

I’m pretty sure they will do a great job with our health care though.

Yup, those numbers are about right. Only thing is, saving spending on oil had nothing to do with the program. The program had to do with stimulating the economy by propping up an industry that was almost bankrupt, making the politicians look good by showing improved consumer spending and a rise in the stock market based on false recovery numbers and reduction in unemployment growth by employing those auto workers a few weeks longer.

The real number to look at is what the consumer that got cash for the clunker got out of it. Saving 320 gallons per year at 2.89 cents per gallon = $896 per year. A crappy car after the rebate is still about $10k financed. With an average credit rating, you will get it at about 7% and being the average desperate person you go for 6 year financing. That is $170.49 per month, or $2045.88 per year. The first 2 years are almost pure interest, so for the first two years you throw away $1149.88 per year for the privilege of improving the lifestyle of someone who owns Ford stock (do you?).

Of course, for those who were going to buy a car anyway, it was a great boon, however since sales increased by ~70%, that is darn few. The funniest part is that the cash for clunkers rebates were smaller than the manufacturer’s rebates that were suspended during the program and cost the dealers more, resulting in laying folks off locally instead of just in the car building states.

See today’s Non Sequitor for a perfect illustration of the whole concept 🙂

Cheers!

I’m not good at calculating these high numbers….but sure makes ya scratch your head!

Oilfield Math;

Working in the oilfield with others such as myself and a wealth of combined experience we understand the accuracy of the following.

Think of it this way:

A clunker that travels 12,000 miles a year at 15 mpg uses 800 gallons of gas a year.

A vehicle that travels 12,000 miles a year at 25 mpg uses 480 gallons a year.

So, the average Cash for Clunkers transaction will reduce US gasoline

consumption by 320 gallons per year.

They claim 700,000 vehicles so that’s 224 million gallons saved per year.

That equates to a bit over 5 million barrels of oil.

5 million barrels is about 5 hours worth of US consumption.

More importantly, 5 million barrels of oil at $70 per barrel costs about $350 million dollars

So, the government paid $3 billion of our tax dollars to save $350 million.

We spent $8.57 for every dollar we saved.

I’m pretty sure they will do a great job with our health care though.

Why is the Press Suprised by Consumer Confidence Crash?

Thursday, February 25th, 2010
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The banks responded to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (Credit CARD Act) by cutting the credit line of everyone below a 900 rating. With their credit limit cut by 50 – 70%, why is anyone not linking this to the drop in consumer confidence? Oh, and they took that last chance to up the interest rate on all those cards and then canceled all of the low-interest offers. Apparently the idea is that if you punish the masses they will complain to the government to be abused the old way instead of the new way.

I still go by the theory that conspiracies aren’t real because those who are suspected of conspiring are too stupid to do so.

Mourning a Great Friend and a Good Investor

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010
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I learned a lot from Thomas (the Commodore)  Daly, including how to enjoy a holiday with a large in-law family and how to invest shrewdly for the  long term. I miss him.

Copied from The Gloucester Times (because I don’t think they use permalinks):

Thomas F. Daly
GLOUCESTER — Thomas F. Daly, 99, a resident of Gloucester and a former resident of Arlington and Cambridge, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 9, 2010.

He was born in Newark, N.J. to his parents, Thomas and Louise (Gendron) Daly. Tom was raised and educated in East Cambridge. From a very young age, he learned how to make a living. From fixing bicycles to opening a fancy lemonade stand, he always showed his entrepreneurial spirit. He was the first person in his neighborhood to purchase a car. Tom was an accomplished drummer in an orchestra in his early years. He was also very fond of playing the piano and organ.

At the age of 19, he opened Daly Mills Curtain & Drapery Store on Cambridge Street in Cambridge. At one point in his life the store expanded to 12 different locations. Tom remained a fixture at the store until his retirement at the age of 82.

Being an avid boater, Tom helped form the Charles River Yacht Club in Cambridge. He held the position of Commodore for 10 years and was also a past Commander for the United States Power Squadron. Since 1944, he and his family have spent the summer months at their cottage in Gloucester. Tom was a devoted to his wife and family. He spent many Sunday’s with his family boating in Gloucester.

The winter months would bring Ski Season and Tom would teach his children to Ski. Of course, Tom’s version of teaching was dropping the Kids off at Ski School so he and his wife Alma could enjoy lunch together. He was involved in several fund-raisers at Matignon High School in Cambridge and is a former President of the Knights of Matignon. He was also an Incorporator at East Cambridge Savings Bank. Tom enjoyed the stock market, trading up until the day before he passed. Throughout his life he strived to be a proud man of strong faith and values.

Tom was the beloved husband of 65 years to his wife, Alma, who predeceased him in 1998. He was the loving father of five children: Alma L. McLaughlin and her husband Bob of Tewksbury, Carol M. Craig and her husband Paul of Rockport, Marilyn J. Breslin of Georgetown, Thomas F. Daly Jr. of Laconia, N.H., and Mary Elaine Daly of Gloucester. He was the proud grandfather of 19 grandchildren and the great-grandfather of 40 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. Along with his parents and his wife, Tom was predeceased by his brothers, Leo and Arthur Daly.

ARRANGEMENTS: Relatives and friends are invited to attend his funeral from the Breslin Funeral Home, 610 Pleasant St., Malden, on Saturday, Jan. 16, at 10 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian burial celebrated at St. Agnes Church, 51 Medford St., Arlington, at 11 a.m. Services will conclude with interment in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Arlington. Visiting hours will be held at the funeral home on Friday, Jan. 15, from 4 to 8 p.m. For guestbook and directions, please visit www.breslinfuneralhome.com.

The Price Is Right…Sometimes

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009
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FreeInternet.com has coupons, discounts, and free stuff availalbe on the Internet cataloged in one handy place. Neat if you are into that kind of thing. Personaly, I tend to bookmark and forget those places, but that is the lazy part conflicting with the cheap part.

TD

Sunday, May 24th, 2009
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I don’t know how I started getting emails from Chris Johnson of the