Posts Tagged ‘investing’

DEO Holiday Bonus?

Friday, October 30th, 2009
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Like clockwork Diageo goes up for the holidays, down for the hangover and up again for the Super Bowl. The trick is calling the highs and lows (or, realistically, calling the right neighborhood of the high and low). This year I am shooting to sell at $69 and buy back at $62. Follow me here to see how it works out 🙂

AGEN

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009
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In at 1.21 (should have stuck to my 1.20).  Limit sell at 1.88 with alerts at 1.8 and 1.02

ICU Medical Inc. (ICUI)

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009
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Good financials and this: ICU Medical board increases stock buyback program

The stock spiked after that announcement. Set alert for $36 to review again when the excitement wears off.

DELL for 2010?

Friday, October 16th, 2009
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Dell: ‘Powerful’ Hardware Refresh Ahead – InternetNews.com

Ferreting Out Ferrellgas Partners LP

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009
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I was thinking about stuff I spend money on, looking to get a little back, and notice a Blue Rhino delivery truck. Long story short (in time this time), they are owned by FGP. The stock doesn’t look attractive at the moment, but keeping an eye on it.

Walmart

Saturday, September 12th, 2009
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InvesterPlace.com says “buy $54 or less”. AskStockGuru.com today says:

Retracement Trade: Consider buy when the price retraces around 48.98 if you are aggressive. Alternatively, a conservative buy would be around 47.57.

I like to split the difference and set a limit at 48.28 and an alert at 46.

Top 100 Global Venture Capitalists

Saturday, September 12th, 2009
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Red Herring published their list this week. According to The Motley Fool’s Rule Breakers, Rule Makers: The Foolish Guide To Picking Stocks, part of follow the money is to see who the other investors are.

The Motley Fool's Rule Breakers, Rule Makers: The Foolish Guide To Picking Stocks

Missed it by That Much

Monday, June 1st, 2009
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A frequent utterance by me. This morning, watching the news (which I do at the gym, on torture devices powered by my movement) I thought “I need to but a buy on GM at $0.50”. Then I got home and was distracted by other obligations and didn’t get to my trading account until 11 AM. Had I followed my instinct, I would have got it at the price I wanted. It actuall dropped lower, then bounce back up to hover in the .80 range.

This would have been a long-term holding for me. My rule is, set a price and that’s it, unless different information comes in. Everytime I break that rule, I lose money. I lose it following the rule, too, but less than half the time vs everytime.

Schwab Does What Theirs Does For Less

Monday, June 1st, 2009
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So I heard Clark Howard say on Morning Express this AM while working off some working from home pounds. As usual, if I hear something worth blogging and am not at my computer (approximately 7% of the day) I made a note to myself on my Blackberry and looked it up when I got home. It appears this an evergreen for Mr Howard, as I found the story on his blog with a dateline of May 6, 2009.

One thing I don’t think his story makes clear is that these are unusually low entry and maintenance costs for index funds. There are many funds with similar entry levels.  Other funds can be entered at the same low cost point if you are using an automatic monthly investment plan.

I fully agree with the enthusiasm in today’s broadcast for the ability for people to have a low entry point to investing.  It may be a good idea to start with a money market fund if things are tight. While the reward is far less, the expenses are also less and the risk is as near zero as possible.  Then you can build up your initial investment and broaden your choices.